If you by now have investigated time in my Cuemon .NET Framework, you may have noticed that I am using naming conventions similar to the one found in the Microsoft .NET Framework; this is by no change a coincidence, since I have studied and come to appreciate the fine work of the architects and engineers at Microsoft.

It is also worth mentioning, that all the assemblies are more or less strictly developed following the book; Framework Design Guidelines by Krzysztof Cwalina and Brad Abrams - a must read for all coders, programmers, developers and derived architects - no excuses allowed.

What should I call you?

It might seem trivial - but comming up with a name to a framework is no small task. In fact, the name for this framework was a combination of several things:

  • First i had the domain qmon.dk (which back then stood for Quality Monitoring)
  • Since that project was abandoned I considered using the short and handy qmon domain name
  • However I did not like having a TLD ending on .dk - it should be more generic - informative if you like
  • My light OCD convinced me that the name should have a length of six characters and represent .NET
  • Playing with "qmon" started a word procssing on "q" which ended with "Cue"
  • "Cue" + "mon" + a TLD of .NET satisfied my requirement of six characters and having a .NET representation
Without further adieu Cuemon .NET Framework was born as a brand new assembly package to complement the Microsoft .NET Framework.
Fun fact: the original, internal name prior to 2008 was MM.Framework.

Timeline

2008

  • Cuemon .NET Framework package was born and consists of four members
    • Cuemon
    • Cuemon.Data
    • Cuemon.Web
    • Cuemon.Xml

2009

  • Research, maturing and POC-implementations

2010

  • Project website was launched - an ASP.NET website built with Cuemon
  • The assembly package was extended with one new member and now consists of
    • Cuemon
    • Cuemon.Data
    • Cuemon.Data.Entity
    • Cuemon.Web
    • Cuemon.Xml

2011

  • Cuemon goes NuGet and was assigned the most accommodating license from Creative Commons
  • The assembly package was extended with two new members and now consists of
    • Cuemon
    • Cuemon.Data
    • Cuemon.Data.Entity
    • Cuemon.Data.Entity.SqlCeClient
    • Cuemon.Data.SqlCeClient
    • Cuemon.Web
    • Cuemon.Xml
  • Parts of Cuemon is now available through a RESTful web API

2012

  • Online and offline documentation for Cuemon .NET Framework now provided using Document! X by Innovasys
  • The assembly package was extended with one new member and now consists of
    • Cuemon
    • Cuemon.Data
    • Cuemon.Data.Entity
    • Cuemon.Data.Entity.SqlCeClient
    • Cuemon.Data.SqlCeClient
    • Cuemon.ServiceModel
    • Cuemon.Web
    • Cuemon.Xml

2013

  • The most ground breaking and codetastic year of the Cuemon project
  • Established a supportive blog for this project with insights, motives and background information
  • A new project is launched to complement this project; Nebula API - a technology neutral RESTful web API that replaces the one from 2011
  • The assembly package was extended with a new complementary assembly package for users of .NET Framework 3.5 and newer
    • Cuemon.Extensions
    • Cuemon.Data.Extensions
    • Cuemon.Data.Entity.Extensions
    • Cuemon.Web.Extensions
    • Cuemon.Xml.Extensions

2014

  • Cuemon .NET Framework Additions was renamed to simply Cuemon .NET Framework

2015

  • Cuemon .NET Framework 3.0.2015.1500 was released to CodePlex as open-source under the MIT License

2016

  • Cuemon .NET Core 4.0.2016.600 was released to CodePlex as open-source under the MIT License

Cogwheels